Shani Burke

Shani Burke

Participant in 2014
Work history Coder, Dept. of Social Sciences, Loughborough University/BBC Trust, October 2013-January 2014.
I conducted Content Analysis of the BBC’s coverage of rural affairs, for an impartiality review.

Learning Support Assistant, Peterborough Regional College, Nov 2012- July 2013.
I provided one-to-one and group support to students with learning difficulties or mental health issues. Duties included setting targets for students and motivating students to remain focused and manage their workload.

Research Assistant, Dept. of Psychology, Coventry University, Jan 2012-Sept 2012 (Funded by the Richard Benjamin Trust).
I worked on a project interviewing refugees living in Coventry, about their experiences in their country of origin and coming to the UK. My responsibilities included conducting the literature review, interviewing participants, transcribing data, data analysis, and assisting with writing up journal papers (see publications record).

Support Worker, Social Care Solutions, May 2011-Jan 2013.
I supported individuals with disabilities or learning difficulties in supported living.

Social Policy Co-ordinator, Peterborough Citizens Advice Bureau, Oct 2010-Apr 2011
I produced evidence reports for the Social Policy department of Central Citizens Advice Bureau, about cases where clients experienced discrimination or unfair treatment, to suggest changes that could prevent such treatment from happening in the future.

Volunteer, Coventry Peace House, June 2010
I supported destitute asylum seekers at a homeless shelter.

Women’s Group and Befriending Volunteer, Coventry Refugee Centre, Nov 2008-June 2010.
My role entailed supporting women who had experienced domestic and sexual abuse. I worked with a team of volunteers to teach English lessons, and worked one-to-one with women to help them to improve their English.

Research Assistant, Dept. of Psychology, Coventry University, Nov 2008- Jun 2009.
I worked on a project discourse analysing focus group discussions about asylum seeking. Responsibilities included updating the literature review, transcribing data, data analysis and assisting with writing up journal papers (see publications record).

Publications:

Goodman, S., Burke, S., Liebling, H. and Zadasa, D. (under submission) '“I Can’t Go Back because If I Go Back I Would Die”: How Asylum Seekers Manage Talk about Returning Home by
Highlighting the Importance of Safety'. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology.

Liebling, H., Burke, S., Goodman, S. and Zadasa, D. (under submission) 'Understanding the Experiences of Asylum Seekers'. International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care.

Rowe, L. Burke, S. and Goodman, S. (under submission) ‘Discursive Enquiries into Race Talk in Online Settings’. Qualitative Research in Psychology.

Goodman, S., Burke, S., Liebling, H. and Zadasa, D. (2014) ‘”I’m not happy but I’m okay”: How Asylum Seekers Manage Talk about Difficulties in their Host Country’. Critical Discourse Studies. 11 (1), pp. 19-34.

Burke, S. and Goodman, S. (2012) “Bring back Hitler’s Gas Chambers’: Asylum Seeking, Nazis and Facebook: A discursive analysis'. Discourse and Society. 23 (1), pp. 19-33.

Goodman, S. and Burke, S. (2011) ‘Discursive Deracialisation in Talk about Asylum Seeking’.
Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology. 21 (2), pp. 111-123.

Goodman, S. and Burke, S. (2010) “Oh you don’t want Asylum Seekers, oh you’re Just Racist’: A Discursive Analysis of Discussions about whether it’s Racist to Oppose Asylum Seeking’. Discourse and Society. 21, (3), pp. 325-340.

Conference Presentations:

Burke, S. and Goodman, S. (forthcoming) “Bring back Hitler’s Gas Chambers”: Asylum Seeking,
Nazis and Facebook: A Discursive Analysis. University of Huddersfield 8th International
Conference on Politeness, University of Huddersfield, 9-11th July 2014.

Burke, S., Goodman, S., Liebling, H. and Zadasa, D. (forthcoming) “I’m not happy but I’m ok”: How Asylum Seekers manage Talk about Difficulties in their Host Country. Lancaster University Department of Sociology’s 8th Intellectual Party/Summer Conference, Lancaster University, June 30th-1st July, 2014.

Burke, S., Goodman, S., Liebling, H. and Zadasa, D. (2013) “I Can’t Go Back Because if I Go Back I Would Die”: How Asylum Seekers Manage Talk about Returning Home by Highlighting the Importance of Safety’. British Psychological Annual Conference 2013, Harrogate, 10th April 2013.

Burke, S. and Goodman, S. (2012) “Bring back Hitler’s Gas Chambers’’: Asylum Seeking,
Nazis and Facebook: A Discursive Analysis. Coventry University End of Year Undergraduate
Psychology Conference, Coventry University, 3rd June 2010.

Media Publications:

Kinman, G. (2013, June). ‘The lives of asylum seekers’. The Psychologist. 26 (6), pp. 401. http://issuu.com/thepsychologist/docs/0613/13.
Study history PhD in Social Sciences, Loughborough University, 2013-2017.
A Discursive and Visual Analysis of Online Rhetoric about Far-right Political Parties in the UK (Funded by the Glendonbrook Doctoral Fellowship).
Supervisors: Dr John Richardson and Professor Susan Condor.
This research considers how far-right political parties in the UK are represented on Facebook. The research focuses on the impact of visual discourse of racism, and the importance of focusing on online discursive constructions that can complement visual analyses.

BSc (Hons) Psychology, Coventry University, 2007-2010.
Upper Second Class Honours.
Modules Included: Advanced Social Psychology, Forensic Psychology, psychology of Anomalous experience, Culture and Gender in Psychology, Research Methods.
Independent Research Project: Discourse analysing how Nazi language is used in Facebook discussions about asylum seekers (see publications record).

A2 Levels, the Deepings School, 2005-2007
Psychology B, Religious Studies B, Biology D.

GCSEs, the Deepings School, 2003-2005
11 GCSEs including Maths, Science, and English, grades A*-C.

Phd Projects

2014

A Discursive and Visual Analysis of Online Rhetoric about Far-right Political Parties in the UK

My PhD will examine how far-right political parties are represented on the social networking website Facebook. Using discourse analysis alongside visual analysis, I will investigate how far-right parties construct their identities online. I aim to demonstrate the benefits of conducting visual analysis of political discourse.
This project aims to build on my research about the function and nature of online discourse about racism. Burke and Goodman (2012) identified extreme and unguarded language in discussions about asylum seekers on Facebook, including supporters issuing extreme accusations of racism towards opponents of asylum, and opponents showing support for Hitler’s ideology. This demonstrates that people engage easily in racist interactions online.
Early research investigating far-right parties used methods such as content analysis, which failed to offer a detailed exploration of their racist ideologies (e.g. Eckhardt, 1968). There is a lack of research addressing visuals used by the far-right, with the exception of Richardson & Wodak (2009), who examined leaflets.
There has been little discursive research analysing images, as the benefits of analysing visual data have not been established in Social Scientific research (Lynn & Lea 2005). However, people communicate through a combination of media including images, therefore images should be considered (Kress & Van Leeuwen, 1996).
I will collect data from the BNP’s and UKIP’s official Facebook pages, and unofficial ‘pro’ and ‘anti’ far-right pages. These are pre-existing to research. Analysis will draw upon discourse analysis alongside a multi-modal approach, in order to construct a more integrated approach (Machin, 2007). Multi-modal analysis involves analysing components and elements of images in relation to text (Kress & van Leeuwen 2006). The aim is to focus on processes and communicative strategies (Machin & Mayr, 2012). Discussions will be subjected to discourse analysis, focusing on the “action orientation” of text (Edwards & Potter 1992:2). This is particularly useful for examining variation in discourse about prejudice. I will analyse how individuals on Facebook make accusations to people in support of the far-right, and how far-right supporters challenge accusations.
This research aims to analyse the pervasiveness, form and extremity of representations of far-right parties on Facebook, and add to existing research on how the far-right deal with accusations of racism. This project will make an original contribution to the theoretical and methodological debates on visual analysis. I aim to show how visual analysis has been underestimated in social scientific research, in terms of the knowledge it can provide.

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