Sally Broughton Micova

Sally Broughton Micova

Participant in 2010
Work history (09/2015 - present) Lecturer in Political Communications
School of Politics, Philosophy, Language and Communications Studies, University of East Anglia, Norwich Research Park, Norwich, NR4 7TJ, UK

(09/2015 - present) Visiting Fellow, LSE Media Policy Project
Department of Media and Communications, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London, WC2 A 2AE, UK

(09/2014 – 09/2015) LSE Teaching and Research Fellow, Deputy Director of LSE Media Policy Project
Department of Media and Communications, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2 A 2AE UK

(06/2011 – 08/2014) Research Officer, LSE Media Policy Project
Department of Media and Communications, London School of Economics and Political Science, Houghton Street, London WC2 A 2AE UK

(01/2004 - 01/2009)
(01/2006 - 01/2009 Head of Media Development & Mission Spokesperson
Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe Mission to Skopje, Skopje, Macedonia

(01/2002 – 09/2003) Head of Media Office
Macedonia Confidence Building Initiative, International Organisation for Migration
(01/2001 – 12/2001) Deputy Director
(01/1998 – 12/2000) Programme Manager
Search for Common Ground in Macedonia
Study history (10/2009 – 12/2013) PhD, Department of Media and Communications
London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdon
Title: Small and Resistant: Europeanization of Media Governance in Slovenia and Macedonia This thesis investigated the role of EU audiovisual media policy in national level media governance

(09/1996 – 08/1998) MA, International Peace and Conflict Resolution
School of International Service, The American University, Washington, DC, USA

(09/1992 – 08/1996) BA (Honours), International Studies
School of International Service, The American University, Washington, DC, USA

Phd Projects

2010

Resistance is Useless? Consequences of the Implementation of European Media Policy for Small States in South Eastern Europe

The Open Society Institute’s latest review of Television Across Europe (OSI, 2008) found that the countries in Central and Eastern Europe show evidence of increased commercialisation and a degradation of the public service functions of television. All the countries it studied are either EU members or at various stages of implementing the acquis communautaire. They have opened up their broadcasting markets in line with the Television Without Frontiers Directive (TWFD) (EC, 1989) and their Public Service Broadcasters are subject to EU state aid regulations. Audiovisual media policy is part of the acquis and its implementation at the national level is part of being admitted into the EU. It has been argued that the EU’s industrial policy approach to this sector undermines the important role that broadcasting plays in the democratic and cultural aspects of a society. The examination of small state media systems has led some scholars to claim that within Europe, small states are particularly vulnerable to commercialisation and domination of their markets by foreign media. This concern leads to my research question: What are the consequences of the implementation of European media policy for small states in South Eastern Europe? As this is the story of the implementation of European policy, the literature on Europeanization, understood as the implementation of EU policy, provides theoretical tools and concepts through which to examine this process. Using an institutionalist approach often taken in studies of EU policy implementation, my research will examine aspects of national-level regulatory practice and dynamics in the domestic opportunity structure in the context of the implementation of European policy. This study will compare the case of Slovenia, a recent EU member, and Macedonia, a candidate country in the process of complying with the acquis. I will explore the vulnerability suggested in the small states typology and potential resistance in the way that national-level actors engage with the European policy. I hope to contribute to refining existing typologies of small state media systems, and instigate more research aimed at reevaluating the assumptions of small states theory. As media policy and other policy areas related to national and cultural identity have not yet been adequately examined by Europeanization research, the findings of my project may inspire further investigation in this direction.

Dissertation

Dissertation title Small and resistant: Europeanization in media governance in Slovenia and Macedonia
Year of defence 2013

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