Juliet Fox

Juliet Fox

Participant in 2015
Work history Career Snapshot:
I have worked in community radio both in Australia and overseas for over 20 years. While completing a Bachelor of Arts in Journalism with a Major in German at RMIT, I began programming with 3CR Community Radio in Melbourne, Australia, on a Breakfast Show in 1991. Since then I have been a broadcaster on 3CR, Radio National and Radio Netherlands. I have also been a 3CR Management Committee member (1995-198) and a Director on the Board of the Community Broadcasting Foundation as well as its General Grants and Digital Radio Advisory Committees (2004-2010). I established the national environment program Earth Matters and worked as a Community Radio Facilitator in Timor Leste for 12 months in 2001 – 2002. I was 3CR Program Manager from 2002-2009 and am currently the 3CR Projects Coordinator. In 2012 I completed a Masters in Global Media Communication, and in 2013 I was awarded an APA Scholarship and began my PhD Candidature in the School of Culture and Communication at the University of Melbourne.

Career History
3CR Community Radio
October 2009 – present
Projects Coordinator
As the 3CR Projects Coordinator I develop, implement and manage community media projects at the station. This is a part-time role that includes applying for grants, liaising with funders, and grant acquittals. Projects range from radio feature production, to collaborative arts in the form of station murals.
Key Responsibilities include:
• Coordination of the station’s program grid
• Facilitation of the Programming Sub Committee
• Coordination of special programming
• Training and technical trouble shooting
• Program feedback
• Podcast approval, set up and maintenance
• Station announcements
I have successfully gained grants from local, state and commonwealth governments for community radio projects. I have also gained funding from philanthropic agencies and initiated and implemented a vast range of community media projects.

3CR Community Radio
April 2002 – September 2009
Program Manager
The 3CR Program Manager position involves a range of skills and tasks and significant time management skills. I am responsible for the smooth running of the program grid involving around 130 shows, as well as coordinating special programming, facilitating the Programming Sub Committee, delivering specialist training and responding to volunteer needs.
Key Responsibilities include:
• Coordination of the station’s program grid
• Facilitation of the Programming Sub Committee
• Coordination of special programming
• Training and technical trouble shooting
• Program feedback
• Podcast approval, set up and maintenance
• Station announcements
I have coordinated the Beyond the Bars NAIDOC Week prison programming since 2002. The project now involves a significant budget and a range of funders, as well as four prisons and the production of a highlights CD. I have also coordinated special programming for Survival Day, International Women’s Day, May Day and International Human Rights Day and others some of which have involved small grants.

Australian Volunteers International (UNESCO funded)
April 2001 – April 2002
Community Radio Facilitator
In 2001 I took unpaid leave from the position of 3CR Current Affairs Coordinator to take up the position of Community Radio Facilitator in Lospalos, Timor Leste. The position was created and funded by UNESCO and involved working closely with a small team of national staff to build the capacity of the newly established Radio Communidade Lospalos community radio station.
Key Responsibilities include:
• Resourcing and support of a newly established radio station
• Creation and coordination of special projects
• Training of volunteers in program production and station management
• Support of the station volunteer Board
• Technical trouble shooting – studio and transmitter
• Liaison with international donors
During my 12 months I worked with the volunteer staff, station manager and board to build capacity in program production, volunteer training, station management and smooth running of a community radio Board of Management. We successfully applied for and delivered 2 key projects during that time: one being a radio documentary series on the role of women in the independence struggle funded by the United Nations Development Program - UNDP; the other being poems and songs of independence by children funded by the United Nations Children’s Fund – UNICEF. I reported to UNESCO fortnightly about the station’s activities and progress.

3CR Community Radio
October 1998 – April 2001
Current Affairs Coordinator
I first began paid work at 3CR as the Current Affairs Coordinator following the change in staff roles from Breakfast Coordinator to Current Affairs Coordinator in 1998.
Key Responsibilities include:
• Support and resourcing of weekday breakfast shows, hometime shows, national current affairs programs, and other specialist current affairs programs
• Program feedback
• Recruitment, training and facilitation of new programmers
• Provide research, background and contacts on current issues
• Support and resource national programs
• Coordination of Undercurrents – a national show produced daily from five participating stations
During my time as Current Affairs Worker I also coordinated coverage of significant issues including the World Economic Forum in 2000 along with creation of the S11 CD; the protests against the proposed uranium mine at Jabiluka and coverage of Timor Leste’s vote for independence in 1999.

Earth Matters
July 1996 – October 2006
Producer/presenter
I established the national environment show, Earth Matters, in 1996 following the demise of the existing environment show nationally on community radio. I successfully applied for a Program Production grant from the Community Broadcasting Foundation in 1998 – a grant which the program has received annually every since.
Key Responsibilities include:
• Production and presentation of a weekly half hour national environment show
• Grant writing and acquittals annually
• Liaison with local, national and international environment groups
• Liaison with the Community Radio Network
• Networking with community stations nationwide
• Program publicity including radio promos and an Avant Card postcard
The weekly production of Earth Matters involved extensive research and production – initially on reel to reel tapes. From 2002 I worked with a team of producers to present weekly environmental justice issues relevant to a national community radio audience. The program continues today as Australia's national, weekly environment show for community radio stations.
Study history Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology (RMIT) - 1990-1992
Masters in Global Media Communication, University of Melbourne - 2010-2012
PhD Candidate and APA Scholarship awardee, University of Melbourne - 2013-present

Phd Projects

2015

Communication for Social Change: A case study investigation into the social change effects of community radio in diverse international settings

Internationally, community radio was established to address issues of inequality and to strive for improved community access and participation within the media. Today, there are thousands of community radio stations across all continents. Within the Australian context, community radio listening continues to rise (McNair 2013) yet persistently there is comparatively little dedicated scholarly attention paid to this third sector. In the new nation of East Timor there are now 16 community radio stations. In general the stations take a normative approach to community radio in seeking to provide a “voice” to ordinary people, and be owned and managed by the local community.
Australia and East Timor’s significant not-for-profit community radio sectors ostensibly have inclusive community structures, and deep social connections specifically designed to address society’s injustices and maximise ‘having a voice’ through the media. My research asks the questions: to what extent, and in what ways, does community radio contribute to communication for social change? A combined theoretical position incorporating critical political economy of communication and a citizen’s media approach is applied in my investigation. Using a case study approach I examine two stations, one in Australia and the other in East Timor, using multiple research methods in order to investigate their contribution to participatory media, communication rights, counterpublics and communicative democracy. My research not only acknowledges the vast, insipid and undemocratic impact of neoliberalism on media and communication systems; but it also thoroughly investigates, raises the profile of, and listens to, the myriad voices, critical media perspectives and alternative community visions created by community radio practitioners in two diverse settings enabling wider consideration of the potential of the community radio form.

We live in a time of continuous global crises—from war, poverty, and the economic meltdown to the threat of climate change. What is not broadly considered is that we may well be in—or entering into—a crisis of democratic communication, or a crisis of voice (Couldry 2010). Communication is central in democracies and cultures—socially, politically and more recently economically. But where are the communication forms that explicitly tackle issues of injustice, oppression, poverty and exclusion? Just as a crisis of finance seems absurd within the wealth of the world; so too does a crisis of communication appear illogical within a time of unprecedented information flows and digital connections. Yet for both it is arguably the overbearing influence of neoliberalism—with its propensity toward private wealth above common good—that stifles communicative democracy and critical participatory media.

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